Zoobiquity (The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health)

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Adı:
Zoobiquity
Alt başlık:
The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health
Baskı tarihi:
9 Nisan 2013
Sayfa sayısı:
416
Format:
E-kitap
ISBN:
9780307477439
Dil:
English
Yayınevi:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
In the spring of 2005, cardiologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was called to consult on an unusual patient: an Emperor tamarin at the Los Angeles Zoo. While examining the tiny monkey’s sick heart, she learned that wild animals can die of a form of cardiac arrest brought on by extreme emotional stress. It was a syndrome identical to a human condition but one that veterinarians called by a different name—and treated in innovative ways.

This remarkable medical parallel launched Natterson-Horowitz on a journey of discovery that reshaped her entire approach to medicine. She began to search for other connections between the human and animal worlds: Do animals get breast cancer, anxiety-induced fainting spells, sexually transmitted diseases? Do they suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia, addiction?

The answers were astonishing. Dinosaurs suffered from brain cancer. Koalas catch chlamydia. Reindeer seek narcotic escape in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Stallions self-mutilate. Gorillas experience clinical depression.

Joining forces with science journalist Kathryn Bowers, Natterson-Horowitz employs fascinating case studies and meticulous scholarship to present a revelatory understanding of what animals can teach us about the human body and mind. “Zoobiquity” is the term the authors have coined to refer to a new, species-spanning approach to health. Delving into evolution, anthropology, sociology, biology, veterinary science, and zoology, they break down the walls between disciplines, redefining the boundaries of medicine.

Zoobiquity explores how animal and human commonality can be used to diagnose, treat, and heal patients of all species. Both authoritative and accessible, offering cutting-edge research through captivating narratives, this provocative book encourages us to see our essential connection to all living beings.
Kitaba henüz inceleme eklenmedi.
As we know, the heart-slowing reflex triggered by states of high arousal, such as fear, pain, or distress, is a core feature of vasovagal fainting in human beings. Alarm bradycardia has protected animals across all classes of vertebrates, and persists in us today precisely because its protective power is so deeply embedded into the autonomic nervous system, which has been passed down from our ancient water-dwelling ancestors. This hypothesis connects the acutely slowing heart of a hunted fish in the water to a human fainter in the ER.
To create instant lordosis (the posture, if not the hormonal reflex), you can go to your closet and put on a pair of high heels. Whether stilettos or wedges, high heels exaggerate the lower back’s normal lordosis. If we didn’t compensate by tipping out our buttocks and arching that lower spine, we would topple over. Maybe the forced, if artificial, lordosis is what’s enduringly attractive about high heels—and why wearing them both looks and feels sexy.
After examining the similar function and physiology of erections, ejaculations, and orgasms in many species, it’s impossible not to postulate that the feelings are also shared. Sensations of orgasm may reward a marine flatworm’s multiple penises as profoundly as they pulse through a human male’s single member. The “shudder” that a primatologist observed “cours[ing] through” a female siamang’s “entire body” after her genitals were licked by a male may have feelings in common with the “violet flannel, then the sharpness” of the poet Molly Peacock’s description of an orgasm. The open-mouthed grimace of a lion climaxing could indicate a roar-gasm; the squeals of a mating tortoise, an expression of pleasure.
Take the 1998 soccer World Cup. England and Argentina had clawed their way up the ladder and were facing off for the chance to compete against the Netherlands in the quarterfinals. While international soccer rivalries are always fierce, this pairing had special resonance for the fans. Sixteen years earlier, the two countries had gone to war over the Falkland Islands. Although Britain officially won the skirmish, many Argentines refused to acknowledge defeat. Every time the two teams subsequently met on the soccer pitch, it turned into a grudge match. This game (which featured a young David Beckham, fouling out after kicking another player in full view of the ref) ended in a tie. The winner would be decided by a penalty kick shoot-out.
One by one, the players lined up in front of the goalie to take their shots. The score had reached Argentina 4, England 3 when the English player David Batty jogged onto the field. He took a few short sharp strides toward the ball … made contact … and sent it soaring. But between Batty’s Puma cleats and the expanse of the goalposts, the ball met the gloved fingers of goalkeeper Carlos Roa—and the winner was Argentina.
The Argentine fans erupted in relieved, joyful mayhem. But English fans watching on TVs in pubs back home gaped in stunned horror. And that day heart attacks across the United Kingdom increased by more than 25 percent.
But certain victims of sudden cardiac death have no previously identified heart problems. In these otherwise healthy patients, a massive emotional jolt alone converts the cardiac rhythm from safe and steady to malignant and deadly. Startled, terrified, horrified, or aggrieved, these patients spew stress hormones, including adrenaline, from their highly activated central nervous systems. These catecholamines gush into the bloodstream. Like a chemical cavalry they appear on the scene, ready to boost strength and stamina to aid an escape. But instead of rescuing the patient, this neuroendocrine burst may rupture plaque deposits, lodge a blocking clot in an artery, and cause a fatal heart attack. It might trigger an extra beat at just the wrong moment and send the heart into VT. And in huge amounts and all at once, the chemicals themselves can be enough to poison muscles, including some of the two billion heart muscle cells in a human ventricle. In these patients, the weapon is essentially the reactive nervous system itself, fully loaded with dangerous catecholamines, waiting for terror to pull the trigger.
If you are an ER doc in São Paulo, you are most likely aware that erections can arise from another surprising source: the venomous bite of the Brazilian spider Phoneutria nigriventer. While potentially toxic and possibly fatal, the venom can also induce an erection lasting many hours. Not surprisingly the venom has been marketed to males for whom more conventional pharmaceuticals have not provided success.

Kitabın basım bilgileri

Adı:
Zoobiquity
Alt başlık:
The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health
Baskı tarihi:
9 Nisan 2013
Sayfa sayısı:
416
Format:
E-kitap
ISBN:
9780307477439
Dil:
English
Yayınevi:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
In the spring of 2005, cardiologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was called to consult on an unusual patient: an Emperor tamarin at the Los Angeles Zoo. While examining the tiny monkey’s sick heart, she learned that wild animals can die of a form of cardiac arrest brought on by extreme emotional stress. It was a syndrome identical to a human condition but one that veterinarians called by a different name—and treated in innovative ways.

This remarkable medical parallel launched Natterson-Horowitz on a journey of discovery that reshaped her entire approach to medicine. She began to search for other connections between the human and animal worlds: Do animals get breast cancer, anxiety-induced fainting spells, sexually transmitted diseases? Do they suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia, addiction?

The answers were astonishing. Dinosaurs suffered from brain cancer. Koalas catch chlamydia. Reindeer seek narcotic escape in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Stallions self-mutilate. Gorillas experience clinical depression.

Joining forces with science journalist Kathryn Bowers, Natterson-Horowitz employs fascinating case studies and meticulous scholarship to present a revelatory understanding of what animals can teach us about the human body and mind. “Zoobiquity” is the term the authors have coined to refer to a new, species-spanning approach to health. Delving into evolution, anthropology, sociology, biology, veterinary science, and zoology, they break down the walls between disciplines, redefining the boundaries of medicine.

Zoobiquity explores how animal and human commonality can be used to diagnose, treat, and heal patients of all species. Both authoritative and accessible, offering cutting-edge research through captivating narratives, this provocative book encourages us to see our essential connection to all living beings.

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